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Top Ten Beaches to Visit in Cornwall

Here at Meadow Lakes, we know that one of the main reasons for visiting Cornwall is the outstanding beauty of the surrounding beaches and coastal areas.

To give you a bit more information about the top beaches you should visit, we have created this top ten beaches in Cornwall Guide…

Porthluney

Porthluney Cove is a privately owned, secluded family beach with a large expanse of golden sand that’s popular with the locals. South facing, in front of Caerhays Castle and Gardens, the beach enjoys a striking backdrop. There’s plenty of room for beach games and exploring the rocks on the west side at low tide. The beach is excellent for swimming. The beach is directly in front of the daily charge car park and seasonal cafe, picnic area and basic toilet facilities are provided.

The opportunity to visit the grounds of Caerhays Castle is well worth while especially in the springtime. The beach is dog friendly all year round but visitors are requested to keep their dogs on leads from June-September. There is no Lifeguard cover provided. Water quality is routinely tested and is currently designated as meeting European bathing water standards.

Pentewan Beach

Over half a mile of east-facing sandy beach, suitable for swimming, surfing, windsurfing, sea canoeing and with a slipway for sailing (canoes and dinghies available for hire). Free car parking, cafes and toilets are provided in Pentewan village 500 metres from the beach along the old harbour lane with disability access.

Please note: Dogs are only allowed on this beach between the first Sunday in November and 01 February – outside this time all dogs are banned from the beach – this beach is privately owned. The owners have the right to change this policy at any time, therefore please check direct for any changes to this policy.

Porthpean Beach

A popular sandy family beach near the historic village of Charlestown that offers swimming and space for beach games. Access to the beach is on a steep incline from the car park. Toilets are provided.

Please note: Dogs are welcome on this beach except between Easter Sunday and 30 September when a seasonal dog ban is in place.

Portmellon, Mevagisey

Portmellon is a picturesque and quiet little cove on the south coast of Cornwall, where visitors come to enjoy the peace and tranquillity that Portmellon offers.
This part of Cornwall is known as the Cornish Riviera, Portmellon itself lies in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the sandy beach is tidal, so can be completely covered at high water!

Gorran Haven Beach

East facing sand beach, popular with families for swimming and surfing. However there is no lifeguard cover provided. There is a beach shop, pub, car parking for 500 vehicles and toilets. Kayaking is very popular at this sheltered bay with reasonable hire rates. Access to the beach from car park 400 metres down a slight incline. Gorran Haven is a popular stop-off point along the South West Coast Path.

This beach is dog friendly, however they must be kept on leads.

Par Sands Beach

Par Sands offers a large expanse of firm sand backed by the dunes close to the village of Par, situated 4 miles from St Austell. This south-facing beach is popular in the summer accessed from the large car park with links to the Eden Project and Wheal Martyn Museum by the Clay Trail Cycle Routes.

Readymoney Cove

Readymoney Cove is a south-east facing sandy beach to the south of the harbour town of Fowey. It is sheltered by cliffs close to the mouth of the River Fowey Estuary and bounded, on one side, by the medieval town of Fowey and, on the other, by St Catherine’s Castle. The beach can be covered during spring tides. The beach is cleaned daily during high season, and a bathing platform is moored in the bay.

Please note: Dogs are welcome on this beach except between Easter Sunday and 30 September when a seasonal dog ban is in place.

Crantock Beach

Crantock offers a large expanse of golden sands backed by dunes between the Pentire Headlands to both east and west. Popular for swimming, snorkelling, surfing and wind-surfing with board/canoe hire on the beach. Dolphins occasionally visit too! Lifeguard cover is provided from late May to late September. Cafes, toilets and parking with 150 spaces are nearby along with a camping site. Access is difficult through steep dunes.

Crantock beach is owned and looked after by the National Trust and is able to care and conserve areas like this, thanks to their members, volunteers and donors. Car park free to National Trust members.

Fistral Beach

Say the word Fistral to any avid surfer and you can guarantee their eyes will widen in awe. As one of the world’s top surfing destinations, backed by high cliffs and sand dunes, Fistral is the playground for hundreds of enthusiasts who flock to the beach to get a fix of the big waves. All the big UK surf competitions take place here including Boardmasters, the Quicksilver Skins, the UK Pro Surf Tour and the BUSA Championships so if you’re a gung-ho pro or a just a timid beginner, this is the ideal place for you to show off or take your first tentative dip in the ocean. Bodhi’s Beach Cafe offers a range of drinks and snacks throughout the main holiday seasons.

Overlooked by the imposing grandeur of the Headland Hotel, the beach is bookended by two headlands that funnel in powerful, hollow waves which regularly reach heights of between 6 and 8 feet. On shore there are plenty of opportunities to book surf lessons or hire gear and a complex of cafes, takeaways and shops is located on the beach.

Holywell Beach

This huge beach of golden sand backed by grass tufted dunes is a perfect example of the north coast’s wide open bays large enough for everyone to enjoy whatever comes naturally. Go body boarding in the water, storm watch in winter or stroll across the sands with the dog, Holywell is also an ideal place to just sit on the beach and read a good book while the kids play in the stream or enjoy the waves.

On the beach you can explore the fascinating grotto-like Holywell Cave with its calcium deposits and at low tide a wreck of an old Argentinian coaster can be seen just offshore. At high tide there is ample room amongst the dunes, some of which rise up 60 feet, for a beach picnic and it’s a suitably romantic spot to watch the sun go down. Nearby is the Holywell fun park with self-drive rides, pitch and putt and a kids zone.

Holywell is owned and looked after by the National Trust and is able to care and conserve areas like this, thanks to their members, volunteers and donors. Car park free to National Trust members.

Poldark connection!: This huge beach of golden sand backed by grass tufted dunes is a perfect example of the north coast’s wide open bays. Owned by the Warleggans, Holywell Bay and its iconic Gull Rock act as the backdrop to some scenes in series two.